The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic proudly presenting a 6-part workshop series: Through the Child’s Eyes with Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych. #1856, Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, RCC, and Dr. Jill Haydicky, R. Psych. #2208.

This series is specially created for every "big person" out there – moms, dads, grandmas, grandpas, caregivers, teachers – who are invested in the growing up of children. Created and delivered by Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, Registered Psychologist, experienced dynamic speaker, Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, RCC and Dr. Jill Haydicky, Registered Psychologist, this workshop series is now in its fourth year. Each of the workshops in this series are meant to stir in each participant the wonder of seeing the world Through the Child’s Eyes. Dr. Lapointe firmly believes that if each of us big people can find ourselves looking out at the world, experiencing and knowing the world, and feeling and responding to the world the way a child does, we are infinitely more capable of responding to children in ways that resonate with the science of development. That is, to do right by our children we need to see the world through their eyes.

Each workshop is a "stand-alone" workshop, and does not require participation in any of the previous workshops.

Registration

Registration is now closed.

Location

All workshops will be offered at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic:

128-3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC V3Z 0K7.
A note about parking: there is a parking lot in the back of the building; there is also street parking on Rosemary Heights Crescent and on 34 Ave.


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The Series

We are thrilled to present the following 6 workshops in our fourth year of the "Through the Child’s Eyes" series:

1. Discipline Without Damage: How to get your kids to behave without messing them up

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
PRESENTER: Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych. (#1856)

When your child is threatening a meltdown in the grocery aisle, is it really possible to keep your cool, get the behaviour turned around, and support healthy development, all at the same time?! Parents, caregivers and big people of all kinds will discover how discipline affects children’s development, why our reactions to our children’s behavior should reinforce connection instead of introduce more upset, and why the disciplinary strategies that may have been used on us as children are not the ones that children really need. In addition, you’ll learn:

  • How the concept of "childhood" has been understood in different ways historically and why we must understand it anew today.
  • The basic and impactful truth behind Dr. Vanessa’s mantra "See it, feel it, be it."
  • The foundation of a healthy, effective approach to discipline that respects your child’s developmental needs… and works!

Dr. Vanessa’s book by this same title will be released in January 2016! As a special offer to all those who attend this workshop, with proof of book preordering (just print and bring your receipt from Amazon!) Dr. Vanessa will sign book plates and will provide online access to a free webinar in 2016.

2. I Can Get Smarter!: The power of a "Growth Mindset"

Tuesday, November 24, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
PRESENTER: Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, MA, RCC

How do we best support our children to embrace challenges rather than run from them, be truly resilient when things feel difficult and celebrate the power of possibilities! This workshop will explore Dr. Carol Dweck’s concept of a "Growth Mindset" versus a "Fixed Mindset". What is it and how do we gift our children the sense that things are possible if we work hard and stick with it. We will also explore the "supporting cast", supporting through challenges whilst remaining connected, the basis of true growth and maturity. This workshop promises to be enlightening and practical.

3. Anger & Eruptions: Understanding anger and what to do about it

Tuesday, January 26, 2016 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
PRESENTER: Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, MA, RCC

Anger in our children is one of those emotions that often takes us by surprise, and indeed, provokes interesting responses out of us as parents. Where does anger come from? When is anger a problem? What does anger have to do with brain development? This workshop will take on the task of helping big people understand the needs of children when anger erupts. We will explore the emotional pathways that lead to angry explosions and we will seek to understand how to respond in ways that calm rather than agitate, and in ways that actually facilitate improved growth for the developing brain.

4. From Mind Full Parent to Mindful Parent: How to strengthen relationships and foster resilience in children

Tuesday, March 1, 2016 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
PRESENTER: Dr. Jill Haydicky, R. Psych. (#2208)

Parenting can often feel like a juggling act. Balancing the demands of work and home life, coordinating appointments and activities, and dealing with daily hassles can leave little time for joyful connection with our children. In this workshop, parents will learn how shifting the emphasis from doing to being has a profound effect on parent-child relationships. We will explore how a mindful approach to parenting moves us from reactive to reflective, and helps us to understand and respond to the needs of our children. We will seek to understand how taking care of yourself and your child supports the development of emotion regulation skills and fosters resilience in our children. Parents will be introduced to mindful practices appropriate for adults and children alike.

5. Screen Time & Attention Deficit: Understanding the growing epidemic of inattentive children alongside the rise of technology exposure

Tuesday, April 12, 2016 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
PRESENTER: Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych (#1856)

The nature verses nurture approach to understanding how children develop leads us to intuit that exactly how brain growth and development unfolds most certainly is impacted by the amount of screen-time and technology exposure that children have. In this workshop we will discuss two key reasons why we must protect our children’s (1) hearts; and (2) brains from the impact of screen time (video games, FaceBook, texting, social media, etc.). Participants can expect some ideas and strategies to put into place for safeguarding their children around technology exposure, a developmental guide to what is safe and when, and an overall understanding of our role as big people must be for our children as we navigate the technology revolution.

6. When the Worry Monster Attacks: Understanding anxiety and the surprising answer to helping your child through it

Tuesday, June 7, 2016 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
PRESENTER: Dr. Jill Haydicky, R. Psych. (#2208)

The prevalence of anxiety in our children has perhaps never been more prominent than now. What has happened that our children are so full of worry? And what shifts need to occur for us as adults to be able to turn worry about the uncontrollable into wonder about the possibilities? As parents, teachers, and other ‘big people’ become increasingly concerned about their children and the functional daily impact of anxiety, our efforts can turn almost frantic as we try to glean helpful, supportive information from the unmanageable amounts available online and elsewhere. Too often this results in ‘quick fix’ approaches to ‘solving’ anxiety, rather than inviting a contemplative approach that is informed by the science of child development. This workshop will focus on making sense of the world of anxiety for children as they experience it and direct us to land on a surprising answer for overcoming it! We will discuss the roots of anxiety and use our understanding of such to inform knowledgeable responses and supports for the children we are growing up who might be struggling with too much worry. The goal will be to provide participants with a developmentally sensitive approach to understanding worry and transforming it into wonder.

To download and print out the information, click here.

Click to look back at the 2012/2013 Through the Child’s Eyes Series, the 2013/2014 Through the Child’s Eyes Series, and the 2014/2015 Through the Child’s Eyes Series

Back to School! Easing the Transition

Summer is rolling on by and back-to-school season has already arrived. Going back to class can conjure up all sorts of thoughts and feelings for our children, let alone ourselves as parents! Excited anticipation or dreaded angst, September signifies a major time of adjustment for children and parents alike.The period from 5 to 8 years of age can be seen as a major turning point, as children experience separation from their parents in a more structured, formal way. Increasing pressure and expectations around academic and social functioning can make this a stressful time for children. Besides preparing for school with new backpacks and school supplies, there are many social and emotional ways we can support our children during this time of transition.

Bedtimes tend to be later and more relaxed during the summer months, but gradually making your way back to a more realistic bedtime before school starts can be extremely helpful for starting school refreshed. School-aged kids need 10-11 hours of sleep at night so keep this in mind as you plan for restful nights in the weeks before the first day of school. Good, consistent sleep habits will set the tone for a successful start to a new academic year.

Since your child’s teacher will be the primary adult responsible for your child during the daytime, it will be essential that you help your child develop a connection to their new teacher. Also known as matchmaking, introducing your child to their teacher and facilitating an emotional connection can reduce any anxiety about being in a new class (and away from you). It sends the message to your child that you and the teacher are working together and are both part of the nurturing village involved in their growing up process. Perhaps seeing a photo of the teacher in advance can be helpful, if this is available. Being intentional about setting up an introduction, however short, can facilitate the start of a caring relationship

Developing (or reintroducing) some rituals around hellos and goodbyes can also be helpful. Maybe a special way of saying goodbye, surprise love notes in lunch boxes, a special item your child can take with them as a small memento that serves to help them feel close to you while apart, these can all make the long days go by more easily. Special family dinners can also create a sense of anticipation for your child while they are at school (i.e. taco Tuesdays). Looking forward to reconnecting with you (their safe haven) after the separation is key to softening the process of being apart.

Finally, it will serve your child well if you are connected to their teacher too. Making a point of meeting them and having regular communication will help the teacher understand the ins and outs of what makes your child tick can help set the stage for more growth and development to occur and for your child to flourish.

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Discovering Treasures during the School-Aged Years

This warm summer weather is a lovely invitation to linger and enjoy the outdoors. What better way to unplug and connect with your child by inviting them to join you in an outdoor adventure? Hit up the playground, build some sand castles at the beach, or go for a bike ride with a surprise ice cream stop! Whatever suits your family’s interests, connecting with your child through playful outdoor activities can be a superb way to strengthen your emotional connection.

The research is clear; free play helps build a child’s imaginative play skills, which can boost brain development in a variety of ways. Social problem-solving, self-regulation, executive function and language development are all areas of a child’s cognitive development that can be strengthened through regular unstructured play experiences. The health benefits of outdoor physical play are also well documented. As parents, we tend to know these things intuitively.

But regularly playing with your child in an unstructured way can also benefit your relationship and strengthen the emotional connection between you and your child. Children need to feel connected to their ‘big people’ in order to thrive and be able to do all the work of growing up. Life can be so full of distractions and a sense of busy-ness, so it is important to remember that the onus remains with us as parents to re-collect our child to maintain our emotional connection. Recollecting just means getting our child’s attention in a loving way.

The best way to invite your child into a playful experience is to focus your attention exclusively on them. Unplug the electronics and take a break from the screens. Pre-empt your child and surprise them with the invitation to spend some quality time together. Maybe it’s going for a nature walk, or a picnic in the backyard. Display empathy to your child by meeting them where they are at emotionally. If they are tired from a day at camp, perhaps they need some downtime on the couch with you beside them before you can transition into a playful activity. Laughter, a sense of playfulness and warmth are all ingredients for building and strengthening the relationship with your child. The relaxed pace of the summer months can be the perfect reason for exploring new ways of bonding with your growing loves so get outside and have some fun!

Read other articles of Discovering Treasures in the School Aged Years

The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic proudly presents
Yoga for Kids – Summer 2015, in connection with Yoga It Up!

Hosted by The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic (Surrey, BC)

Empowering kids & youth to be happy, healthy & condent
The Wishing Star is thrilled to be in connection with Yoga it Up! to bring Yoga to the children and families of our community and beyond. Using the tradition of Hatha yoga as the base, Yoga it Up founder, Julia Johnson Baker, draws from her educational and training expertise in the areas of emotional health and wellness, positive psychology, mindfulness, and developmental neuroscience to promote child health and wellness.

Half-Day Fun Camps

July 16 & August 13 (Thursdays) | $55 + GST / camp

9:00am – 12:00pm | 4-8 yrs
1:00pm – 4:00pm | 9-12 yrs

From Worrier to Warrior (Group Classes) – Summer Session

July 8 – August 26 (Wednesdays, 8 Weeks) | $190 + GST / 8 classes or Summer Flex Pass

3:00pm – 3:45pm | Preschool (3-5 yrs)
4:00pm – 5:15pm | Early Elementary (5-8 yrs)
5:45pm – 7:00pm | Late Elementary (9-12 yrs)
7:15pm – 8:30pm | Teens

Summer Flex Pass
Not sure you can commit to all 8 classes?
Register for 6 weeks for regular program pricing ($150 + GST), and if you choose to complete the additional 2 classes, receive 20% off those classes. Your choice of dates to attend.

Private Sessions

By appointment | Private sessions are available in order to tailor a class to your child’s specic emotional and/or physical needs. Inclusive of special needs.

Yoga’ing Up the Inner You: A Workshop for Kids & Youth

2.5 hrs | $100 + GST

This workshop is designed to lay the foundation to build invaluable life skills learned through the introduction of yoga and tools of positive psychology, including: self-kindness, self-worth & self-regulation of emotions.
A perfect introduction, or addition, to our regular psycho-socio yoga programming for children and youth.

August 29 (Saturday)
9:30am – 12:00pm | Preschool (3-5 yrs)
2:00pm – 4:30pm | Early Elementary (5-8 yrs)

August 30 (Sunday)
2:00pm – 4:30pm | Late Elementary (9-12 yrs)
6:00pm – 8:30pm | Teens

Next series: October 2015. Alternative dates and times are available at Yoga It Up’s other location in South Delta. Please contact us for details.

To download and print out the information, click here.


Registration

Pre-registration required. Class size is limited, so early registration is strongly encouraged.

Payment can be made:
- over the phone (778-294-8732) by credit card or
- in person at the Wishing Star offices at 129 – 3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC, V3Z 0K7.

Click here for our contact information.

Registration will be confirmed with a $25.00 deposit. The remaining balance is due 2-weeks prior to the first class or 2-weeks prior to date of camp/workshop/program. Deposit is non-refundable within 2 weeks of class start date/date. If your class has to be cancelled due to lack of registration, you will be refunded the deposit.

Download a Registration Form

Location

Yoga for Kids – Summer 2015 will be offered at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic:

128-3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC V3Z 0K7
Phone: 778-294-8732 | Fax: 778-294-3732


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Supporting Your Child after the Death of a Loved One

When a loved one passes away, children may experience a broad range of emotions including sadness, guilt, anger and longing. Depending on their age and developmental stage, children may have a limited ability to verbalize their feelings. Similarly, their understanding of death and corresponding grief responses also change and expand as they develop. Childhood grief appears different from the grief experienced by adults, and can often occur in spurts.

Supportive tips for parents

  • Find ways to have your child feel connected to the loved one that has passed.This connection might be a shared interest (e.g. “you love singing just like your grandpa did”), a physical commonality (e.g. “you have her smile”), a way to send messages, and a focus on the afterlife if your belief system incorporates this. Storytelling and memory sharing are also ideal ways of inviting connection.
  • Talk to your child about death in a simple, clear and direct manner because this will aid in their understanding of death as irreversible, inevitable and universal. Open space for increased dialogue, particularly if your child is indicating a need to process verbally. At the same time, don’t be surprised if he/she appears ‘fine’ and unaffected.
  • Dispel any misconceptions (i.e. magical thinking about being to blame for a family member’s death) they might have. Check in with the child to see if they have understood your explanation, and reassure that they are not the cause of their loved one’s passing.
  • Increase nurturing activities for physical and emotional comfort will be helpful for soothing your child. Think about extra cuddles, reading together, baking and enjoying favourite snacks.
  • • If your child is feeling angry and is engaging in more disruptive behaviours, it is important to validate and accept his/her anger and set clear boundaries as needed. Think of yourself as a big container – large enough to hold all his/her tricky feelings. The disruptive behaviours may be a way to express underlying needs for increased nurturing, reassurance, or a need to feel in control.
  • Providing the child with some ways for expressing their angry feelings. Physical activity, drawing, singing or writing can all be creative avenues to express anger and keep it from becoming bottled up inside.
  • • If your child is expressing a feeling of guilt, normalize that many children feel this way, but accept his/her feelings and reassure that the child did not say or do anything to cause their loved one to die. Your child might need to hear these reassurances many many times so that they can integrate this into their understanding.
  • Engage in meaningful experiences of remembering and celebrating the life of the deceased. Looking at photographs, talking with family members, or creating a special ritual for your family can all be helpful ways to memorialize a loved one.
  • A child who did not have a chance to say goodbye, may benefit from writing a letter to their loved one who has died or from visiting a memorial site. These types of rituals together with other family members and friends can also increase the connectedness and cohesion between your child and yourself and other supportive people in your lives.
  • Your experiences with grief may not be the same as your child’s. Be gentle with yourself and seek your own support for coping.
  • If you have more questions or specific concerns about your child’s coping, you can consult a mental health professional to address your concerns and unique circumstances. Together with a mental health professional, you can explore how therapy may help your child express their grief in healthy ways.

Read other articles from Discovering Treasures in the School Aged Years

Summer Learning Workshops for Kids 2015

Summer is a great time for fun and adventure. Summer is also an excellent time to review learning skills and tools and start preparing for school success in the fall. The Wishing Star is now offering interactive learning workshops for students ages 8 and up.

Workshops will be a combination of learning, discussion, and practical tools and strategies. Workbooks are included.

Outside of these group offerings, one-on-one learning support is also available.

1. Let’s Get Ready - equipping kids with foundation learning skills

Friday, August 7, 10am – 12pm

This workshop is a great introduction to some key learning habits and strategies for optimal learning. Foundation skills to be explored include:

  • Positive learning behaviours, and focus and attention
  • Internal dialogue and positive self-talk
  • Asking questions/being curious
  • Following rules and directions
  • Vocabulary development
  • Reading for pleasure
  • Reflective learning
  • Personal best
2. Smart kids - teaching kids how to learn

Friday, August 14, 10am – 12pm

So often kids are taught what to learn but not how to learn. This workshop will look at the process of learning, and the learning how to learn skills, including:

  • Learning styles
  • Learning strategies and ways to remember information
  • Brain booster tips and memory tools
  • Textbook exploration and note taking
  • Active reading and reading comprehension
  • Study habits and test taking skills
  • Making mistakes
  • Preparation and planning
3. Smart, not Scattered - teaching kids the executive functioning skills

Friday, August 21, 10am – 12pm

Ever feel your child is scattered and forgetful? You are not alone. This workshop aims to increase kids’ awareness and understanding of the executive functioning skills, and will provide some practical suggestions to put these skills to good use. The executive functioning skills to be looked at include:

  • Response inhibition
  • Working memory
  • Emotional control
  • Attention
  • Time management and organization
  • Goal-directed persistence
  • Self-Monitoring/self-management
  • Planning and prioritization
4. Ready, Set, Go! - preparing kids to be ready for school

Friday, August 28, 10am – 12pm

School is coming and it’s time to get ready! It’s helpful to start talking with kids about what they can do to prepare and also what to expect in the school year ahead. Topics explored include:

  • Successful learning strategies
  • Managing anxiety in learning
  • Transitions and changes
  • Personal best at school
  • Life balance and lifelong learning
  • Reflective learning
Location

These workshops will be offered at the The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic:

129-3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC V3Z 0K7.


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Cost

$100 / Workshop

Registration

Please contact our office
Phone: 778-294-8732 | Fax: 778-294-3732 | Email: info@lapointepsychology.com

Click here for our contact information.

To download and print out the information, click here.

Promoting Your School-aged Child’s Self-Esteem

As a child and family therapist, parents regularly ask me how they can boost their child’s self-esteem. We all want the very best for our children including a sense that they are happy and confident. But how can we go about promoting a healthy self-esteem in our children in the day-to-day?

First of all, self-esteem can be defined as the way we look at ourselves. A healthy self-esteem is the sense that one is good, capable and secure. It is not a sense of entitlement or superiority(this is a different concept all together).The primary way in which we can build our child’s self-esteem is through loving them unconditionally. This is by far, the most foundational element for a child’s emotional health. A child who feels worthy can have the confidence to tackle challenges that come along in life. Conveying this with your words and actions will truly make this a felt experience for your child. The development of self-esteem in the school years is related to a history of being accepted and supported by parents or other primary caregivers.

Secondly, in order for self-esteem to flourish, a child does need to experience some successes or a sense of achievement. Excelling in a school subject, learning a new skill or thriving in a sport are all examples of real accomplishments school-aged children can experience. Like adults, a child will evaluate herself by what she does, which in turn, informs her understanding of who she is. So finding ways for your child to excel at something (i.e. being a friend, enjoying ballet classes, reading to a Kindergartener) will help pave the way to a healthy self-esteem.This does NOT mean that we need to push our child beyond her capabilities but rather, set the stage for her to experience reaching her own goal and experiencing a sense of being capable. If your child is struggling, you will want to consider how to create situations where they are set up for success to get the ball rolling.

To summarize:

  • Accept and appreciate your child just the way she is. This will her accept and appreciate herself too.
  • Create expectations that are developmentally appropriate so that your child can feel competent in her efforts. This will help positively influence her motivation to get after the doing!
  • Celebrate and encourage her efforts (i.e. "you worked really hard on that!"), rather than giving your child empty praise (i.e. ‘you are so smart!’). The key is to provide opportunities for realistic self-appraisal.
  • Provide your child with some scaffolding for the skills on which she is working and find ways to connect with her learning experiences at home.

If you have concerns about your child’s self-esteem or want to discuss any parenting challenges in detail, please call our office at 778-294-8732 to book an appointment with one of our child and family counsellors/psychologists.

Read other articles of Discovering Treasures in the School Aged Years

"It’s mine!" And Other Common Proclamations Among Siblings. Ideas For Inviting Cooperation Amongst your Brood.

It’s past six o’clock and you are finishing the final preparations for dinner, your spouse is stuck in traffic and the kids are exhausted from a long day at school and karate lessons. In the background, you can hear their voices slowly begin to escalate and you sense some conflict arising over a highly coveted toy. Sound familiar? It seems we have all been there.

The same little ones who can be ever so endearing can also lead you to feel completely exasperated with their bickering. Sibling rivalry spans from the early childhood years and well into the school-aged years and is a relatively normal part of family life. Various factors can influence the amount of fighting between siblings, including, child temperament, birth order, age of the children and times of family transition.

Siblings may be fighting as a way of getting more attention from parents, as a way of connecting with their brother or sister, to experience a sense of fairness/justice or as a way of combatting boredom. Whatever the reason(s) may be, here are some general guidelines that can act as lampposts along the windy road of parenthood.

As parents, our aim is to use discipline primarily to teach new skills and gain cooperation. It may be tempting to fall into the trap of using discipline primarily for punishment. However, in the long run, our hopes are most often connected to instilling particular values and morals into our children that they will take along with them on life’s journey. It is important to take your children’s rivalry seriously, primarily because you are in the position to help manage and contain conflict that could become harmful to them. As their parent, you have their backs and are their ‘big person’. It is so important to appear to have all the answers, even when you feel you may not. This is especially the case when they become emotionally undone. :)

Avoid the trap of favouring one child over the other. It is not necessary to play referee and determine who started it, but more critical to figure out what is behind your child’s actions: "What is my child trying to convey about his or her needs?" When you can see this, it can be much easier to connect with your child on an emotional level, before delving into problem-solving.

Secondly, conveying empathy to your children while they are at odds helps them become more skilled at showing genuine care and concern for each other. "Susie, it looks like you are frustrated because you didn’t get to have your turn." An empathic statement, and soft tone of voice can often defuse a tricky situation. When we model reflective listening, we help our children learn how their actions impact those around them. An added benefit is that your children will feel understood and cared for, which will lead to more receptivity when it is time to problem-solve and set limits.

Once they have calmed down, it is time to help them problem-solve their way through an issue. It is important to remember that this process only works well when both children are calm. If they are still emotionally escalated, it will be nearly impossible to access the thinking part of their brains and begin negotiating or creating some ground rules. It will be helpful to creatively approach the challenges they face and come up with win-win scenarios or invitations to respect each other. It is key to do this in a manner where you come alongside them, inviting their ideas and suggestions.

Lastly, it can be a wonderful buffer to engage the whole family in activities that are fun for everyone. An outing to the local swimming pool, a walk on the beach or a games night may be just the type of activity your children will enjoy. When they enjoy each other’s company in a shared activity, it can act as a lovely antidote to the fighting and may make it a faster turn-around when they do come across another hurtle.

Read other articles from Discovering Treasures in the School Aged Years

The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic proudly presents
Yoga for Kids – Spring 2015, in connection with Yoga It Up!

Hosted by The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic (Surrey, BC)

Empowering kids & youth to be happy, healthy & condent.

The Wishing Star is thrilled to be in connection with Yoga it Up! to bring Yoga to the children and families of our community and beyond. Using the tradition of Hatha yoga as the base, Yoga it Up founder, Julia Johnson Baker, draws from her educational and training expertise in the areas of emotional health and wellness, positive psychology, mindfulness, and developmental neuroscience to promote child health and wellness.

Special Workshop for Girls!

April 11 (Saturday) | $100 + GST

Empowerment Workshops for Girls meets Yoga It Up! With Yoga It Up and Ms. Lindsay Sealey, B.A., M.A. Ed.
A focus on self-kindness for girls, mindfulness through yoga, and related crafts and activities. | 9:00am – 12:30pm

Spring Session 1

April 15 – May 6 (Wednesdays) | $100 + GST / for 4 weeks

Homeschool (5-8 yrs) | 10:00am – 11:15am
Homeschool (9+yrs) | 11:15am – 12:30pm
Preschool (3-5 yrs) | 1:30pm – 2:15pm
Early Elementary (5-8 yrs) | 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Late Elementary (9-12 yrs) | 5:00pm – 6:15pm
Teens | 6:30pm – 7:45pm

Spring Session 2

May 13 – June 17 (Wednesdays) | $150 + GST / for 6 weeks

Homeschool (5-8 yrs) | 10:00am – 11:15am
Homeschool (9+yrs) | 11:15am – 12:30pm
Preschool (3-5 yrs) | 1:30pm – 2:15pm
Early Elementary (5-8 yrs) | 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Late Elementary (9-12 yrs) | 5:00pm – 6:15pm
Teens | 6:30pm – 7:45pm

Spring Weekend Session

May 3 – June 14 (Sundays) | $150 + GST / for 6 weeks *No class on May 17, Victoria Day long weekend

Preschool (3-5 yrs) | 2:45pm – 3:30pm
Early Elementary (5-8 yrs) | 3:45pm – 5:00pm
Late Elementary (9-12 yrs) | 5:15pm – 6:30pm
Teens | 6:45pm – 8:00pm

Private Yoga Sessions for Psycho-Socio Support

Contact to make your appointment

These sessions are inclusive of children with special needs. Covered by some insurance providers.
Saturdays | 9:00am – 1:00pm


Age Groups

Preschool (3-5 yrs) | "My time to shine"
Early Elementary (5-8 yrs) | "Finding your inner scientist"
Late Elementary (9-12 yrs) | "Mindful Moments for Me"
Teens | "Yoga’ing Up the Inner You"


To download and print out the information, click here.


Registration

Pre-registration required. Class size is limited, so early registration is strongly encouraged.

Payment can be made:
- over the phone (778-294-8732) by credit card or
- in person at the Wishing Star offices at 129 – 3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC, V3Z 0K7.

Click here for our contact information.

Registration will be confirmed with a $25.00 deposit. The remaining balance is due 2-weeks prior to the first class or 2-weeks prior to date of camp/workshop/program. Deposit is non-refundable within 2 weeks of class start date/date. If your class has to be cancelled due to lack of registration, you will be refunded the deposit.

Download a Registration Form

Location

Yoga for Kids – Spring 2015 will be offered at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic:

128-3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC V3Z 0K7
Phone: 778-294-8732 | Fax: 778-294-3732


View Larger Map


Proudly presenting a 5-part workshop series:
Through the Child’s Eyes with Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych. #1856, and Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, RCC.

Hosted by The Wishing Star Developmental Clinic at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic (Surrey, BC)

This series is specially created for every "big person" out there – moms, dads, grandmas, grandpas, caregivers, teachers – who are invested in the growing up of children. Created and delivered by Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, Registered Psychologist, experienced dynamic speaker and Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, RCC, this workshop series is now in its third year. Each of the workshops in this series are meant to stir in each participant the wonder of seeing the world Through the Child’s Eyes. Dr. Lapointe firmly believes that if each of us big people can find ourselves looking out at the world, experiencing and knowing the world, and feeling and responding to the world the way a child does, we are infinitely more capable of responding to children in ways that resonate with the science of development. That is, to do right by our children we need to see the world through their eyes.

Each workshop is a "stand-alone" workshop, and does not require participation in any of the previous workshops.

Registration

Registration for each workshop in the series is now open!
There are a limited number of seats available so early registration is strongly encouraged.

Tickets: $20 + GST / person per workshop  |  $30 + GST / parenting couple per workshop

Payment can be made:
- over the phone (778-294-8732) by credit card,
- via mail by cheque (Registration Form to be completed and included) or
- in person at the Wishing Star offices at 129 – 3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC, V3Z 0K7.

Payment must be received within 3 business days of a phone call reservation for a reserved spot to be held. Registration is open until the day before each workshop is presented provided space is still available.

Click here for our contact information.

Download a Registration Form if you are mailing in payment.

Location

For the 2014/2015 year, these workshops will be offered at The Wishing Star Lapointe Developmental Clinic:

128-3388 Rosemary Heights Crescent, Surrey, BC V3Z 0K7.


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The Series

We are thrilled to present the following 5 workshops in our third year of the "Through the Child’s Eyes" series:

1. Knowing & Trusting

Tuesday, November 18, 2014 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Presented by Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, MA, RCC

(This is the foundational workshop of the series and was also presented in 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 – repeat attendees are welcome! Those new to the series are strong encouraged to attend this foundational workshop)

The treasure of knowing that you are "being held in mind" brings with it an incredible amount of trust for the young child in their big person. Imagine knowing that your big person so understood you, so cared for you, so had your back, and so wanted to do right by you that you could just sit back, relax, and trust your development to unfold in the manner nature intended! This is what we want for our growing children. We don’t want young children to have to up the ante to have their developmental needs met. This leads to unnecessary challenges and a foundational disruption for the child who is simply trying to grow up. How then do we instill in our children that sense that they are being held in mind? Knowing and Trusting is a workshop that offers big people different ways to think about and approach gifting a child the treasure of being known and of "being held in mind." This will include understanding key concepts foundational to the relationship between the child and their special big people, as well as a year-by-year developmental understanding from birth through 8 of how a child’s special big people can connect with them in meaningful ways.

2. Large & in Charge

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Presented by Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych.

Sometimes things get turned upside down and you find your child telling you what to do and how to do it. In other words, being bossy, demanding, prescriptive, and generally large and in charge! There is a reason this is happening with increasing frequency for our children. Contrary to popular culture, this reason is not that children need a firmer, stricter hand. The true reason for why children are adopting the large and in charge stance is much more complex. This workshop will focus on understanding how things get flipped upside down in today’s parenting culture, and will provide ideas for taking steps toward turning it right side up!

3. Anger & Eruptions: Understanding anger and what to do about it

Tuesday, March 3, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Presented by Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, MA, RCC

Anger in our children is one of those emotions that often takes us by surprise, and indeed, provokes interesting responses out of us as parents. Where does anger come from? When is anger a problem? What does anger have to do with brain development? This workshop will take on the task of helping big people understand the needs of children when anger erupts. We will explore the emotional pathways that lead to angry explosions and we will seek to understand how to respond in ways that calm rather than agitate, and in ways that actually facilitate improved growth for the developing brain.

4. Time out for Time Outs: Understanding the needs of children in the world of discipline

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Presented by Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych.

The science of child development has gifted us an incredible understanding of the growing brain and the needs of children. At the same time, we are surrounded by an overwhelming amount of "pop-culture" information and "fads" regarding how we are meant to discipline our children. And very often, we find ourselves lost in the "noise" of behaviour, rather than finding helpful ways to make sense of it, and move beyond it. The focus of this workshop is to facilitate an understanding what does and does not work for children when it comes to discipline. We will discuss what makes some approaches to discipline, such as Time Outs, actually harmful to the developing brain. And we will explore developmentally informed alternatives that allow us to guide our children in nurturing ways.

5. Friend or Foe?: Understanding social skill development in the growing child

Tuesday, June 2, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Presented by Ms. Rebecca Mitchell, MA, RCC

In the current culture in which we grow up children, the pressure to "socialize" them begins earlier and earlier. Our children attend baby groups, structure play dates, begin preschool, and transition into formalized education at ever younger ages. We are taught as parents that our children need to be proficient in social settings in order to have any chance of making it in this world. But what does the science of child development have to say about this hyper focus on social skills for the growing child? In this workshop we will discover the needs of growing children as they compare with the wants of the social world around us. We will explore what is healthy for brain development in the world of social skills…and what is not. And we will investigate ideas and approaches for ensuring our children both get what they need and can find their way through our social world.

To download and print out the information, click here.

Click to look back at the 2012/2013 Through the Child’s Eyes Series and the 2013/2014 Through the Child’s Eyes Series