Archive for "General Information" Category

  • Toy & Product Fair - 2012.10.23 ( General Information )
    It’s that time of year again! The Lower Mainland Annual Toy & Product Fair will be taking place on November 21 at the Coast Hotel & Convention Centre. There are over 50 exhibitors (including us!) offering unique and innovative gifts for children of all ages and abilities. This year parents can also participate in CHILD Day (Children’s Health Information Learning & Development). An opportunity to talk to community child development professtionals about behaviour challenges, child care, emotions, etc. Read more »
  • Healthy Habits, Healthy Families - 2012.09.23 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier, R. Psych.
    Wishing Star Associate

    Ah, school is now back in full swing, and it can feel like summer is already a thing of the past. But back to school can mean back to a routine for a lot of families, which can be a great thing those routines include healthy lifestyle habits. The Kelty Mental Health website has a whole toolkit designed to support families in their healthy habits – everything from yummy breakfast ideas to physical activities the whole family can enjoy to sleep tips for helping your teenager’s chore of getting up in the morning easier (sometimes referred to as good ‘sleep hygeine’). They also have great relaxation ideas that are appropriate for anyone from children to adults, including MP3s of guided meditations. Remember, you can be creative and make relaxation activities game-like for younger children – preschoolers love to practice yoga poses or tense, stretch and relax their muscles like different animals (e.g., turtles or cats). Click on the link below to access their family toolkit, and check out the additional resources on the right hand side for some more quick ideas.

    This blog posting is not a form of psychological counselling, advice, therapy, or assessment and should not be used as such by any individual. This blog posting is provided only as an article intended to encourage thought and discourse. For specific psychology related services, please contact an appropriate healthcare provider.

     

  • Back to School Time Again! Tips to Support Children with ADHD - 2012.08.26 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier, R. Psych.
    Wishing Star Associate

    Well, it’s that time of year again – summer camps are coming to a close, and back to school commercials are in full force on the TV and radio. This can be an exciting time for kids looking forward to starting a new year, but for families who have a child with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), there is often a lot more to think about than just shopping for new clothes and making sure their backpacks and pencil cases are stocked for the year. For children and adolescents with ADHD, organization and getting back to the school routine and schedule can be a particular challenge. However, there are a lot of things that parents can do to help their kids in these areas. Read more »

  • What do you Mean we are Leaving Now? - 2012.06.25 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier, R. Psych.
    Wishing Star Associate

    The other night at a dinner party, a friend was telling me a story of a fond memory from her childhood. She described how her parents picked her up from elementary school, and stated that they were heading to McDonald’s. Excitement overflowed, as she was not allowed to eat McDonald’s very often. Then, in the next minute, they said, “actually we’re not going to McDonald’s, we’re going to Disneyland!!” The bags were packed in the trunk, and they were on their way to the airport. My friend described her disbelief and then her absolute excitement at the upcoming trip. Read more »

  • Stop All That Noise! Supporting Kids with Auditory Sensitivities - 2012.05.13 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier, R. Psych.
    Wishing Star Associate

    Usually I have an easy time blocking out extraneous noises when I’m working. But the other day, at my home office, I had the opportunity to gain a glimpse of what it might be like for students with auditory sensitivities. We are doing some construction on our upper deck at the moment, and the workers (all 6 of them!) were trudging in and out of the house and firing the waterproofing material all day. Read more »

  • My Child Doesn’t have an LD, Now What do I do? - 2012.04.30 ( General Information )

    Sherri Frohlick, M.A.
    Wishing Star Associate

    The most common reason children and adolescents are referred for a psycho-educational assessment is because they are struggling to perform at age-or-grade level standards in the classroom. Comprehensive assessments for these types of referrals typically include measures of thinking and reasoning skills (cognitive ability), academic performance (academic achievement), executive skills (ability to monitor and manage one’s own self, emotions and belongings), Read more »

  • Supporting Students with Written Expression Difficulties - 2012.04.25 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier
    Wishing Star Associate

    Do you know a child or student who seems to have difficulties expressing their ideas in writing? These written expression problems may come about for a number of reasons. For some kids, they struggle with using the fine motor skills required for printing or handwriting, making the task of getting their ideas down in written form very challenging. This can be particularly frustrating for students when they have a lot of great ideas and thoughts but their hands cannot keep up with their brains! For other kids, particularly those in the early grades, they may not have enough practice with knowing how to form their letters or what direction similar shaped letters should be facing (e.g., b vs. d). Read more »

  • How Emotions Impact our Brains and Bodies - 2012.03.28 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier
    Wishing Star Associate

    Have you ever wondered what happens to our brains when we’re feeling upset, angry, or scared? When adults and children feel these and other emotions, a part of our brain called the limbic system gets activated, along with one of its structures called the amygdala (see the picture below). When we become aroused (e.g., mad, frustrated, disappointed, scared), we move into our “emotional brains”, which are focused on processing and dealing with the emotion at hand. When this arousal is very strong, our ability to use the language centers of the brain and rational thinking (the main job of the frontal lobes at the front of our brains) decreases and becomes more challenging for us. Read more »

  • Learning is Everywhere! - 2012.03.21 ( General Information )

    Dr. Carla LeHouillier
    Wishing Star Associate

    This past week, while on holiday, I was reminded yet again that learning happens everywhere. I was visiting my in-laws and spending some much needed quality time with my young nieces. We were all sitting around the table for breakfast, and my niece, who is just about to turn 9, was fully engaged in a make-believe game of restaurant. She had written up a menu of our breakfast items, and was going around the table taking our orders and taking the role of “waitress”. We were laughing and joking about the “fanciness” of the restaurant ($5 for one slice of toast!) and she was having a blast immersing herself in this fantasy play. In that moment, I was struck by how much learning was occurring without anyone even trying. Read more »

  • Exercise and the Impact on Your Child’s Mental Health - 2012.03.15 ( General Information )

    Amanda Hall, M.A.
    Wishing Star Associate

    A lot has been made about the growing obesity epidemic in our children today. It can be hard to compete with video games and finding the time in our busy lives to fit in time where children can just go play outside and burn off some steam. Exercise is not only beneficial to our kid’s physical health, but also has a major impact on their mental health. Exercise can help improve a child’s self esteem and confidence. It can reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. It can increase their concentration, provide a more restful sleep and show a significant improvement with their mood. Read more »